In response to a story published March 4 in the Hill Country Community Journal, we have received several messages from area residents asking how they can be tested in a kidney screening specifically to see if they might be a living donor match for Tivy High School senior Kaelyn Connelly.

Her mother Kathy Connelly said she recommended the following process provided through University Health System in San Antonio, where Kaelyn has been going for her dialysis treatments.

Using a desktop or laptop computer, visit the website www.UTCLivingDonor.com, the University Transplant Center – Living Donor Program.

Under the Living Donor heading, use the link to “kidney donation” and in the first paragraph there is an online link to the “health history questionnaire.”

The form says the information given on this form will be held “extremely confidential and will not be shared with the recipient.” It says it should take 15 to 20 minutes to complete.

Where the choice is allowed, mark “living kidney donor.”

The form includes spaces to fill in a box for “Named Recipient” and the first name and last name of the preferred recipient – Kaelyn Connelly – and the recipient’s birth date, but that information is optional.

The person filling out the form is asked to mark that he or she accepts the transplant program’s “Terms of Use” and wishes to proceed with this process.

On the form it says completion of the first page is required before the online form can move to the next page.

At the Transplant Center, the Living Donor Team can be reached at (210) 567-5777.

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